Bugs Bunny – Antibiotic-Resistant Bugs Go Wild 

One of the most notorious and hard-to-treat bacteria in humans, Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), has been found in wildlife, according to a new study in the Journal of Wildlife Diseases. The researchers isolated MRSA in two rabbits and a shorebird. Wild animals may act as an environmental reservoir for the disease from which humans could get infected. http://goo.gl/5U9Yd 
Image: Harvey Henkelmann/Wikimedia Commons 
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One Response to Bugs Bunny – Antibiotic-Resistant Bugs Go Wild 

  1. I'm not sure of that statement: "Wild animals may act as an environmental reservoir for the disease from which humans could get infected". While I do appreciate that 'could' is not 'do', coming into contact with Staphylococcus aureus, be it methicillin-resistant or otherwise, does not usually lead to you becoming infected. In fact, many people naturally (and normally) have Staphylococcus aureus on their skin, where it lives in a benign and harmonious form along with the other million bacteria on your skin. Only when some peturbation occurs in the environmental balance (such as you cutting yourself with a knife, and the bacteria then entering your bloodstream) can a potential infection occur.So there is no need to be afraid of rabbits just yet. But never try and feed or pet wild animals, and never touch sick or dead ones

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