The battle against TB

The Guardian I have written a lot on MicrobiologyBytes about tuberculosis (TB) as a remerging disease, but the global TB situation is still poor, so it’s always worth bringing this issue to people’s attention again. Writing in The Guardian, Nick Herbert points out the painfully slow progress which has been made (The fight against TB is not over):

The rate of new cases of TB has been falling worldwide for about a decade, enough to hit a UN millennium development goal target, and deaths will have nearly halved since 1990. But a decline of 2% a year in the estimated incidence rate suggests that the disease is being beaten at a shamefully slower rate than when the west tackled it a century ago. On current progress it will take at least another 100 years. The latest World Health Organisation report, published last month, warned that 3 million people a year who develop TB are being missed by health programmes. Most worryingly, less than a quarter of drug-resistant cases are being detected and less than half of those that are detected are successfully treated.

So hats off to Mr Herbert for highlighting this important issue. But this is The Guardian, and the byline to this story includes the phrase “western leaders need to act now“. Mr Herbert points out that:

London has the highest rates of TB of any city in western Europe. The borough of Newham has rates equivalent to Nigeria.

All of which is true. Commenters on The Guardian article weren’t slow to mention that Nick Herbert is a serving Tory MP, who was previously director of public affairs at the British Field Sports Society for six years. While the editorial process at The Guardian has ensured that the facts in Mr Herbert’s article are correct, it’s hard to disentangle this piece from the Tory agenda on limiting immigration and the aftermath of the failed badger cull.

So yes, we need to do more about TB, as some of us have been pointing out for years. But we also need to be critical and questioning about where we acquire information and how we react to it. Politicians and science generally don’t mix. On the whole, that’s a good thing – there’s already too much politics in science.

 

This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.