Quorum Sensing Genes Discovered in a Bacteriophage

phiCDHM1 Some groundbreaking new research from my Leicester colleagues that’s too good to resist blogging about:

The incorporation of host DNA into phage genomes occurs across diverse bacteria, and acquisition of bacterial genes facilitates phage evolution. Although small, phage genomes have a high proportion of coding sequence relative to their size. The extent by which virus genomes can increase is constrained physically by the dimensions of their virion particles in which their DNA is packaged, by fitness costs associated with phage production, and by their packaging strategy. Although genetic material can be acquired via transduction and during DNA packaging, phage genomes are considered to be highly reduced and non-beneficial genes are lost through selective evolution. Therefore, discoveries of bacterial gene homologs in addition to the “core” phage genome are interesting, as is the diverse nature of these host associated genes.

Clostridium difficile is a major pathogen in healthcare settings, causing antibiotic associated diarrheal disease which can be fatal. Novel strains continue to emerge in clinical settings, and potential reservoirs of the bacterium include asymptomatic humans, wild and domesticated animals, and the natural environment. C. difficile pathogenicity can also be altered by the differential expression of their virulence genes, controlled via quorum sensing (QS) which is a form of bacterial communication. Through quorum sensing, cells communicate to the surrounding population via the release and detection of signalling molecules which elicit a physiological response. This paper describes the discivery of homologs of QS genes in a phage of C. difficile.

While the action and consequences of these phage QS genes is unclear, their presence and transcription during infection in a lysogenic and lytic background presents an exciting method by which phages can manipulate their hosts.

 

What Does the Talking?: Quorum Sensing Signalling Genes Discovered in a Bacteriophage Genome. (2014) PLoS ONE 9(1): e85131. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0085131
The transfer of novel genetic material into the genomes of bacterial viruses (phages) has been widely documented in several host-phage systems. Bacterial genes are incorporated into the phage genome and, if retained, subsequently evolve within them. The expression of these phage genes can subvert or bolster bacterial processes, including altering bacterial pathogenicity. The phage phiCDHM1 infects Clostridium difficile, a pathogenic bacterium that causes nosocomial infections and is associated with antibiotic treatment. Genome sequencing and annotation of phiCDHM1 shows that despite being closely related to other C. difficile myoviruses, it has several genes that have not been previously reported in any phage genomes. Notably, these include three homologs of bacterial genes from the accessory gene regulator (agr) quorum sensing (QS) system. These are; a pre-peptide (AgrD) of an autoinducing peptide (AIP), an enzyme which processes the pre-peptide (AgrB) and a histidine kinase (AgrC) that detects the AIP to activate a response regulator. Phylogenetic analysis of the phage and C. difficile agr genes revealed that there are three types of agr loci in this species. We propose that the phage genes belonging to a third type, agr3, and have been horizontally transferred from the host. AgrB and AgrC are transcribed during the infection of two different strains. In addition, the phage agrC appears not to be confined to the phiCDHM1 genome as it was detected in genetically distinct C. difficile strains. The discovery of QS gene homologs in a phage genome presents a novel way in which phages could influence their bacterial hosts, or neighbouring bacterial populations. This is the first time that these QS genes have been reported in a phage genome and their distribution both in C. difficile and phage genomes suggests that the agr3 locus undergoes horizontal gene transfer within this species.

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