Remember what happened last time we "cured" AIDS?

Immune Timothy Brown, the “Berlin patient” was freed of HIV infection via a bone marrow transfusion from a compatible CCR5Δ32 donor in 2007.

Last year there was a report of a newborn baby cured by very early drug therapy. The news today carries reports of a second case in a baby which confirms that this approach can work in newborns, although not in adults with established HIV infections.

Also in the news today is the story of the phase I clinical trial of gene-editing technology to control (but not eliminate) HIV infection using autologous donation to create CCR5Δ32 in the patient’s own cells (Gene Editing of CCR5 in Autologous CD4 T Cells of Persons Infected with HIV. (2014) N Engl J Med 2014; 370: 901-910 doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1300662). But as Nature News correctly points out, the big story here is the relatively crude zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology used in this study as opposed to the much more powerful transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) technologies under development to edit the somatic genome.

Watch this space for further updates.

 

This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.